Public Education Strategies

Public Education Strategies


you’re gonna be hearing today from Sam
Cole with the Colorado Department of
Transportation from Ali Maffei with the
Colorado Department of Public Health and
in the environment and from Paige
McGowan from the Spokane Regional Health
District so we are all sort of involved
in one way or another in public
education campaigns marketing outreach
that kind of thing
education is one of the many what now
conversations that you have post
legalizations and we all have had
various challenges with tackling how we
want to educate our publics about it
in the city we have taken a particular
focus on youth and any of you who are in
the youth prevention and education
session yesterday heard quite a bit
about the city’s sort of two pillars of
how we’ve approached youth education
thus far the diversion of programming
through our office of behavioral health
strategies that Ed talked about and then
the pro-social healthy lifestyles
programming that Molly and Brianne
touched on and those have been
incredibly effective programs and we’ve
seen good results from them and we’ve
reached a lot of kids that way but
frankly they are not all that visible to
the broader public citywide here in
Denver and so a little over a year ago
we decided that we wanted to maybe
pursue a third leg of s the youth
education strategy through somewhat less
depth but a much broader more mass media
focused campaign to see if we could
still have some effective messaging but
reach a broader group of kids in the
city and so that’s what we have been
working on you’re gonna see some more
fleshed out campaigns from these guys
that have already been through some
iterations have been through the market
I’m gonna talk more about
nitty-gritty development phases of doing
a campaign like this which is what we
are neck-deep in right now in the city
so what is our goal we want to take away
for kids in the city of Denver to
understand that not everyone is using
marijuana there’s there’s some
misconceptions about that and we want
kids to spark a conversation among
themselves to influence one another
about what is important to know about
underage marijuana use so as I mentioned
we are in the nitty-gritty of developing
this campaign as we speak and we are
primarily targeting 12 to 17 year olds
within the City and County of Denver
proper here now seems like maybe a
narrow group but there are unique
challenges and different approaches to
communicating about weed to a 17 year
old as well as a 12 year old so we’ve
got actually a pretty big audience to
reach here and again as I mentioned the
problem we’re trying to solve for is
that Denver kids sort of feel like
marijuana use is the norm and in fact it
is not and so we want to again have have
these kids influency influencing one
another to help them understand some of
the issues that come up with underage
marijuana cases and its effects so the
foundation of this is through a few main
categories of research so surveys most
notably the 2015 healthy kids colorado
survey which is administered at the
state level in alleys shop and provides
some incredible insight and two kids
attitudes and behaviors about all kinds
of risky behavior but also gives us some
county level data that we
can dive into here locally looking at
past campaigns of course this is not
something that’s been around for too
long but there are examples that we can
look at from other states and other
countries and lessons learned and
takeaways from that if you need a
breather today at Google the stoner
sloth campaign if you want to see
something that we are trying not to do
here in Denver and of course focus
groups so groups of actual Denver youth
who are in our target audience giving us
feedback about where we should be taking
this campaign so some of our takeaways
from this research has been again from
that Healthy Kids Colorado survey
realizing that 74% of kids in Denver
aren’t using marijuana but their
perceptions is that it’s closer to half
so again there’s a little bit of a
disconnect there kids understand that it
is illegal to use it but they may maybe
don’t understand the nuances of the laws
and some of the specifics and again they
that’s sort of developing brain until
you’re 25 that is out there most most
kids understand that but maybe not what
the actual health effects are so when we
talk about messaging and campaigns and
youth focused marketing we know that
you’ve got to be real for a lack of a
better term facts and authenticity as
what resonates with this with this
audience and we also know that we need
to create a little bit of tension and
the messaging actually you know is going
to strive to perhaps make kids feel a
little bit uncomfortable and question
that conversation is not going to happen
the conversation we’re trying to start
is not going to happen without that
tension may be obvious but definitely
worth restating is that
youth especially teenagers want to be
spoken to as adults they have
significant influence over one another
and they need time to process these
things on their own so where are we
going with a Denver youth marijuana and
education campaign again this is still
in development won’t be in the market
until December but wanted to give you
all a sneak preview of what we’ve been
working on so Denver youth are going to
discuss the high costs and we want them
to again talk about the health and
social risks that can come from smoking
marijuana we want to give them that that
spark to influence one another through
conversation and of course we want to
create buzz and and really I guess get
those kids to pause and think about is
this worth it right now is it worth the
potential long-term risks any of you
who’ve driven by high school recently
has probably seen some pretty creative
fence articles show you’re kind of a
quick example of what we’re talking
about here again just a really engaging
way to get a message across again this
is just conceptual but we’re gonna draw
on the colors and themes of our local
schools and use this as a platform for
some maybe less traditional out-of-home
messaging I still on the ramen okay good
another application of our campaign is
going to be a game show called weeded
out and we’re harkening back to the
remote-control days of MTV or jeopardy
really firing lots of questions that
kids to to get them talking about what
are what are some real facts about
cannabis use what are some things that
they can they can use as tools again to
carry that conversation forward and
influence one another there’s a
take-home version of it that we’ll be
developing a classroom in a box if you
will that’s something we can take into
schools and other events and have kids
use on their own again the same sort of
approach with a lot of trivia style game
show style questions to to get this
conversation going now this is all going
to be happening over the better part of
the next year and of course we will have
a mandate to evaluate our work and see
how we’re doing one of the ways we’ll do
this is through that survey data now we
ran a pre campaign survey to sort of
give us some baselines and try to
understand kids attitudes and behaviors
and we will go back to those questions
hopefully gauge what they learned not if
they learned anything we’re gonna find
out exactly what it wasn’t they learned
see what they remember about the
campaign see what they liked again the
healthy kids colorado survey is a is a
huge tool for us and I guess it’s every
two years is that correct and so
actually there’s a the next sort of
report out on that will be from 2017
data and then again we’ll be looking two
years out from that at the 2019 data to
see and continue measuring ourselves
against what kids are reporting here in
Colorado the youth convention I’m mesh I
mentioned briefly some of the focus
groups and we’ve been paneled a group of
kids here
Denver to sort of help not only help
guide the development of this campaign
but serve as ambassadors for it once
it’s out there and we’ll be asking
repeatedly this group for their feedback
on it and you know it’s a it’s a good
mix of Denver kids sort of a
cross-section of the city if you will
and you know we’re really going to be
looking to them for their attitudes
their impressions and their takeaways
and then of course we’ll be evaluating
our media and all the different
strategies that we are gonna put in
place for this so that is a quick and
dirty overview of the high cost campaign
that will be launching here in Denver
shortly and I’m gonna go ahead and turn
it over to my colleagues here on the
stage all right hi everyone my name is
Alison Massey or Ally and I work at the
State Health Department is Dan Manon
mentioned I managed the retail marijuana
education program for the state and I
decided to focus a little bit on our
youth campaigns as well but I’m happy to
stay after and talk to anyone about some
of the broader education campaigns that
we have so a little bit about the state
health department we play a lot of
different roles related to marijuana
within the state but I think the two
most important for our conversation
today include looking at data and trends
as well as serving that public health
education our motto or our kind of
slogan is educating the public about
safe legal responsible use of
recreational marijuana and so these
campaigns grew out of that effort so
first things first biggest lesson
learned ever is before you launch
anything public education related around
marijuana is make sure you have good
science to stand on so this very hefty
report is released out of the State
Health Department they formed the retail
marijuana public health advisory
committee that’s broken into three
sections they look at use patterns they
look at adverse effects such as
like hospitalizations and emergency
department visits and then they also do
systematic literature reviews of all of
the health effects related to marijuana
and so when we say marijuana is
dangerous for kids we only use
information in here about why if you
google marijuana you’re gonna find that
it kills you and cures everything so you
need somewhere you need that the good
science to be able to stand on and
something to reference back to there
they had certain level of criteria for
any messaging that they would use in
this certain criteria for any sorry
messaging as campaigns for any research
that they looked at is what I meant to
say so there are some studies that are
very poorly done that may have
significant results on one end or the
other related to health effects of
marijuana but if the study was not well
structured then it’s not included in
here so they had pretty high standards
for the type of research that they would
include which then as we know limits the
amount of research you can look at
related to marijuana but we didn’t want
to make claims that we knew could be
proven false quickly so that’s a really
big lesson learned I know it’s not
really about campaigns but in a way it
really is because your messaging will be
scrutinized all the time particularly I
would say our most contentious campaigns
are the youth campaign the social media
sentiment that comes back afterwards is
why aren’t you saying this about alcohol
it’s way worse for them so that’s
generally the pushback we get on any
youth messaging about marijuana well
alcohol is worse and then for
breastfeeding and pregnancy we get a lot
of pushback that no marijuana is
actually good during that stage so it’s
really important to be able to have
science to stand on
so Dan mentioned the healthy kids
Colorado survey just to kind of put it
in context across the entire state not
just in Denver we have not seen any
statistically significant changes in
marijuana use among adolescents across
the state in a number of years so you
can see it’s remained relatively
unchanged that’s also supported by the
national survey on drug use and health
so we’re probably right in line with the
national averages the margin of error is
similar across both so what we know is
that four out of five Colorado high
schoolers do not use marijuana in the
last 30 days and that’s really important
as dan referenced the social marketing
and social norming for youth is to say
no everyone’s not doing it it’s also
really important for parents and our
focus groups with parents they would say
when we would ask how many youth do you
think are using marijuana and they’d say
80% and then was your kid using well no
oh so your kid is magically a part of
the only 20% that you don’t think is
using but that luckily those parents
perceptions of youth were also
inaccurate it’s only 20 percent of youth
that are currently using marijuana and
then what do we know about the impact of
adults in the lives of youth so youth
who agree that their teachers care and
encourage them are nearly twice as
likely not to use marijuana you to know
that they can ask a parent or guardian
for help or 1.6 times less likely to use
marijuana youth who have clear family
rules their parents have laid down the
law at home about what it means to use
marijuana and what would happen to them
they are 1.7 times less likely to use
and if a parent feels like underage use
is wrong their children are four times
less likely to use marijuana so any
youth campaign that we knew we launched
had to include that important parent
component to educate them to start these
conversations because they’re more
impactful than any campaign we can ever
have if we only focus on youth we will
not see those kinds of results
so our program includes the social
marketing campaigns community education
and prevention the statewide portal for
all information related to marijuana
statewide integration as we work with
other like for instance the Department
of Education to be able to align our
messaging and evaluating our efforts so
we know that effective prevention and
this comes from Samsa the substance
abuse and mental health services
administration that social marketing
alone is usually not very effective
unless it is combined with interventions
across the community so looking at
policy changes looking at your
coalition’s those are often called
making sure that your curriculum schools
is reinforcing the same message and then
also releasing social marketing
campaigns are really what leverage
success in a community so we do have a
lot of information about policies using
evidence from alcohol and tobacco and
trying to apply those to marijuana we
don’t have a strong evidence base yet
for marijuana related policies but we
are trying to work to establish that
with community outreach our office of
behavioral health at the state level
funds they’ve received about I think
four million dollars that they put out
in community grants and then we have a
nine million dollar program that we fund
communities that care which is a
community organizing model that is
evidence-based to reduce substance abuse
so we fund 48 communities all across the
state to implement communities that care
health education curricula we’ve been
working very closely with the Department
of Education to be able to make
evidence-based health education
curricula available to schools what’s
really hard though is that the evidence
base for all health education curricula
was done in a world where marijuana was
illegal so will that same evidence hold
true in a world where marijuana is legal
we have yet to see but we’re using the
best evidence available to be able to
promote those so with social marketing
campaigns it’s always important to make
sure that you segment your audience you
listen to what they believe about the
issue you test the message with them go
where they are and keep listening and
adapting going to the audience looks
like reminding state legislators that
they don’t see
youth campaign because they’re not
between the ages of 12 and 20 and that’s
a hard thing for people if they’re
putting money towards the effort they
want to see it but they’re not the
target audience so we often have to
remind them of that same thing her Board
of Health I asked if anyone on our Board
of Health had seen our youth campaigns
and only the youth advisor that sits on
our Board of Health had seen the youth
campaign I was like perfect that means
we’re doing our job right because the
rest of you shouldn’t see it so our
campaign timeline we’ve launched a
variety of campaigns all under that safe
legal responsible use so the first
education campaigns for the general
public launched in January 2015 that has
to do with money kind of another lesson
learned for those of you who may be in
states that are legalizing is you can’t
spend money to educate the public until
the money is coming in from the sale
which means you’re launching a year
after legalization and so identifying
funds early on to be able to launch
education public education in advance of
legalization really important wasn’t an
option for us and so we have
spanish-language pregnancy and
breastfeeding legalization of marijuana
in Colorado raised a number of questions
and concerns among residents even for
those who supported legalization one of
the biggest concerns was whether the
availability and normalization of
marijuana would increase use among
Colorado’s youth the Colorado Department
of Public Health and Environment set out
to address these concerns by developing
two distinct yet complementary campaigns
the first was for youth inspiring them
to focus on their goals instead of using
marijuana the second was for parents
teachers coaches counselors and other
adults that youth trust empowering them
to have informed and effective
conversations with the young people in
their lives to help keep them from using
marijuana our research with Colorado
youth showed they were skeptical of
health statements about the consequences
of marijuana use youth rejected preachy
tones and scare tactics and were quick
to judge content that felt like it came
from a biased point of view we
also found that youth believed using
retail marijuana underage could get in
the way of accomplishing their goals so
with that in mind we created protect
what’s next a campaign that helps youth
prioritize and achieve their goals and
keep marijuana from getting in their way
using online ads we drove our audience
to protect what’s next com where they
could use a digital interactive tool
that helps youth discover and achieve
personal goals while educating them on
how the health effects and legal
consequences of using marijuana underage
can get in the way of those goals more
than 3,000 youth have started
discovering what’s next for them by
using this tool we also developed the
protect what’s next challenge a
statewide student-led competition that
introduced youth to the challenges and
triumphs of setting and achieving their
goals working in partnership with 63
Colorado middle schools we generated
more than 15,000 student submissions in
just four weeks and we partnered with
TEDx Mile High to create protect what’s
next adventures a series of 11
once-in-a-lifetime experiences with
entrepreneurs and craftsmen from across
Colorado but protect what’s next wasn’t
the only voice speaking to Colorado’s
youth our research showed that youth
were seeking out conversations about
marijuana with adults they trust so we
connected with parents teachers coaches
and counselors through our good to know
trusted adults campaign this campaign
delivered encouraging and empowering
messages to adults via TV radio and
online ads as well as through local
community outreach efforts and an
original TV Town Hall in partnership
with Denver’s cbs4 we even partnered
with well-respected bloggers and
influencers producing twenty eight blog
posts to reach our audience with trusted
local experts the campaign drove our
audience to good to know Colorado comm
slash talk where they can flank tools
and tips designed to help adults talk
effectively with youth about marijuana
also combat misperceptions of teen
marijuana use data showed nearly 25% of
parents were under the impression that
most youth used marijuana regularly when
in fact four out of five high schoolers
do not use marijuana in three years
after legalization current marijuana use
among Colorado youth remains unchanged
from pre legalization data 84% of
Colorado parents with teens have talked
with their kids about the risks of using
marijuana and we continue to monitor and
adapt our message to both parents and
youth ensuring we remain relevant and
prevent youth marijuana use moving
forward
all right so have you ever gone on
maternity leave and then come back and
your staff put together your slides and
you’re just shocked by how good they did
sorry I just got back from maternity
leave I did not know they embedded that
all right so anyway my staff are so
great um so you learned a lot about our
campaigns the trusted adult and the
youth campaign and how those complement
each other I have a couple examples up
here of some of those resources what you
learned about the adventures from there
that reaching you through the middle
school challenge was a really awesome
kind of push that we were able to do
with Colorado middle schools I do want
to highlight a lesson learned here for
us though is we avoided and I know Dan’s
facing some of these challenges too of
how obvious is your marijuana messaging
and so we did not want to be in any
middle school that had an elementary
school attached to it because we didn’t
want to inappropriately expose to young
children to anything related to
marijuana we also didn’t want a high
school attached because we didn’t want
high schoolers who were too cool for
anything pooh-poohing middle schoolers
involvement in the challenge and
inadvertently through those parameters
that meant a lot of rural schools did
not get selected to participate in the
challenge because a lot of rural schools
are kindergarten through 12 all in the
same building and that’s something we
did not do enough research ahead of time
to make sure and so we would totally
change that type of effort moving
forward so what we’ve heard from our
youth evaluation we partnered with a
program that funds a lot of afterschool
programs across the state and they added
a couple evaluation questions to their
surveys that we could learn a little bit
more how youth reacted to our campaigns
and what we saw is that youth exposed to
the campaign were significantly more
likely to agree that marijuana made it
harder to think and do things and would
affect one’s body and cause cravings and
then we also saw with adults who live
with children they had a statistically
significant increase in their plans to
talk to children about the risks of
marijuana their perceptions of risk for
a teen using regularly and the
perceptions of risk of unsafe storage in
the home the video highlighted that
great statistic
eighty-four percent of parents say that
they’ve talked to their teen about
marijuana guess what happens we ask the
teens how many of their parents talk to
them about marijuana not 84 percent so
hopefully through these resources we’re
equipping parents and teachers and
coaches to have a more blatant and
honest conversation about marijuana
where maybe it’s not where both both
parties know that they’re having a
conversation not just the parents so a
few of the things that I brought with me
I have a couple examples from campaign I
have a couple that you all are free to
take from her general education campaign
the purple brochures from our tourism
efforts and then the green brochure the
little fold-out is what we currently
make available in retail stores to be
able to educate users about marijuana
and then I have just singular examples
of some of the other campaigns the
parent handouts pregnancy and
breastfeeding handouts one this was part
of the middle school challenge it was a
journal for them to capture some of
their goals where they keep hustling and
then we also have our youth toolkit this
was a peer-to-peer education opportunity
for youth to be able to educate other
youth about marijuana of course that
takes an adult equipped to help them
guide them through that conversation but
we also have this youth toolkit and we
partnered with Denver to be able to
pilot it in some of their locations
after school locations to make sure that
it was youth appropriate and could be
facilitated by youth so these are a few
of the things that we have and I’ll be
here afterwards if you want to ask any
questions with that I’ll turn over to
Paige
well hi everyone so Paige McGowan I work
in Spokane County I actually am a
contractor for the department of health
and Washington State so I’ve noticed
we’ve been hearing a lot from the state
level at this conference and I’m gonna
be speaking about local effort so I work
for Spokane Regional Health District and
we serve a six County regions were
funded by the Washington State
Department of Health to work on youth
marijuana prevention and our six
counties are considered pretty rural and
overall we probably serve 600,000 people
in Spokane County we have about 500,000
people which is primarily where I work
sorry about that
so I just wanted to give you a little
bit of context for that and then I’m
gonna be telling you a little bit about
a campaign that we did and the reasons
we did it and how grateful we are for
our friends in Colorado who helped us
set the tone for that so a few things
here the reason that we started this
campaign it’s called weed to know is
because we had a lot of complaints in
our community about public consumption
people using everywhere in our parks and
playgrounds in our downtown core
specifically we had an increase in calls
to the Washington State poison center
for people accidentally ingesting
marijuana and consuming marijuana kids
especially a lot of concerns from
different community partners coalition’s
in the public around driving under the
influence and then just a general
misunderstanding of the law and lack of
clarity around what’s legal I mean a lot
of people in our state will say like
it’s legal that’s that so we wanted to
do something around education and even
more so we went and met with our County
Prosecutor’s Office and we talked with
law enforcement and we really learned
that although we may not see education
as a regulatory issue it really is a
regulatory issue because our prosecutor
wouldn’t prosecute DUI or public
consumption or any of that because they
felt strongly that there was no public
education done yet so people continue to
say we didn’t know or
no and so this really propelled us to
use some of our youth marijuana
prevention funds to develop a campaign
that was actually targeted at adult
marijuana users also in our state we
have a youth marijuana prevention
campaign facilitated by the Department
of Health it’s called listen to your
selfie and it does target youth but we
didn’t have anything like good to know
and we didn’t have anything at all that
targeted adult marijuana users are
educated to any adults about the law
also our funding from the Department of
Health it was a little unusual and that
they gave us our first batch of funding
for what they called year one which we
got and we had to spend about two
hundred fifty thousand dollars in three
months so year one was May April May and
June of 2016 so we got this money and
we’re like oh great why don’t we do with
two hundred fifty thousand dollars so we
had the funds to be able to do a
campaign and then we also are really
fortunate to have an in-house
communications department that could
help us so it didn’t cost us anything
but in directs through our agency which
I recognize it’s not a lot of people
have that but we have amazing
communication people and a graphic
designer of our own so I want to talk a
little bit about the timeline like I
said we had three months total to could
be spun spent so that meant that we had
six weeks to develop a campaign the good
thing is is that we actually met with
Ally and others from her team and we
loved good to know we wanted to do
something like it because we felt that
met the needs of our community so we
talked with them got permission to use a
very similar look and feel and actually
played off the title good to know and we
did do some message testing with several
different partners in our community we
have in our in our agency we have around
a thousand methadone treatment patients
that come to our agency every single day
so we did mesh message testing with most
of them report using marijuana so we did
lots of message testing there lots of
message testing in the community we
worked with the liquor and cannabis
board who regulates marijuana in our
state to make sure that they liked the
messages and they could use them as well
we also had the messages reviewed by law
enforcement so we were on the same page
that Public Health was going to take on
educational approach in terms of
budgeting and funding like I said this
was funded by youth marijuana prevention
dollars to get us started now we fund it
with local capacity development funds
and for our first wave of media after we
had the messages developed I’m going to
show you the messages in a second but we
had about $28,000 to be able to launch
this our recommendation from our
communications just to do a heavy push
on targeted digital it’s like web-based
and on phone so it’s like that things
that pop up and tell you when you’re
somewhere like hey did you know there’s
50% off granola right now it’s like that
except for marijuana is there so we
could target people based on if they
were frequenting certain websites and
stuff and then that was for the whole
month half of May and and June we spent
$28,000 and we placed ads in all all of
our popular newspapers that reach over
50,000 people in our community and then
we did placements in marijuana
advertisement like magazines and
publications and then we did a lot of
targeted digital and then we did a
second wave in October of 2016 through
December and we focused primarily on
driving people to the website so they
could learn more and we spent about
16,000 dollars on that I’ll tell you a
little bit about the analytics and how
that little bit of money and what it got
for us so far we primarily looked at how
long people stayed on our website which
the communications people tell me is a
really important thing so on average
people stay on our website for almost 3
3 minutes and 30 seconds which is a is a
lot of time if you’ve ever measured how
much people are reading your information
3 minutes is a really long time it means
people are clicking through they’re
reading the material and then our
click-through rate was also about point
0.09 percent which is also very good so
when people saw the ads they were really
interested to click and learn more so we
made sure that our website had a lot of
information on it we also made sure that
people could download the resources to
use and
communities because as soon as we
launched this we got a lot of requests
so I’ll show you the ads if you’ve seen
good to know Colorado it looks very
familiar we came up with six ads one is
on addiction we do have a 23 24 hour
hotline in Washington State that people
can call it the recovery helpline so we
wanted to promote that because nobody
really knows about it everybody knows
about 1-800 quit now but we don’t think
very many people know about the this
this wonderful resource so we really
tried to frame it in addiction and
normalized calling and asking for help
we did one on driving under the
influence and we worked with our
Washington State Traffic Safety
Commission and really asked them hey
what’s your recommendation should we
give to people about consuming marijuana
and then driving and at that time they
said we don’t have one because we don’t
know so our message is if you’re high
today don’t drive today and then we also
came up with one for educating people
about marijuana being unsafe and illegal
for anyone under 21 we get a lot of
questions about that like if it’s okay
if parents give marijuana in their home
to their kids so we wanted to clarify
that through a message and then we also
came up with one for safe storage I’m
really promoting if you’re gonna have
this in your home consider like alcohol
or other household cleaning products so
people are kind of getting familiar with
you know storing it safe and out of
sight that message is really similar to
the good to know and then we also did
one about talking to youth about the
risks of marijuana use one very engaged
adult in any youths life make all the
difference so we really wanted to
promote having a conversation don’t be
afraid of having a conversation and on
our website we have some tips for doing
that and then our big one is this this
public consumption one which I’ll tell
you about the success of that in a
minute so we launched this campaign and
right away we got a really really
positive response from our community and
one of our biggest partners now is our
downtown Spokane partnership which is
like our business district they were
having a lot of issues with public
consumption and a lot of the people who
are using in public are people who
hang out downtown most of the day some
of the people who are not permanent
residents of Spokane just passing
through also a lot of youth coming down
from our high schools that are near a
downtown core and consuming with adults
in the community so it’s not good for
the image not good for law enforcement
and they called us and said what can you
do how can we work together so we ended
up coming up with this rack card so this
is a on the left side as a front and
back and we put all six messages on the
back and we partnered with downtown
Spokane partnerships ambassadors to
actually talk with people when they
would see them using marijuana instead
of just ignoring it going up and talking
to them offering resources and educating
them in a non-judgmental way and right
away our our captain of our downtown
precinct he came to us and said I want
my officers to participate in this
because we can’t just keep issuing
tickets because people don’t pay their
tickets and this doesn’t change behavior
so anyway we did some training with law
enforcement and they the downtown
ambassadors and our law enforcement now
approach people and actually talk about
marijuana use and they point them to the
hotline and they just have an
opportunity to assess for that person’s
overall well-being rather than just
issuing them a citation or ignoring it
altogether the one thing that we have
done some emphasis patrol one with our
law enforcement is adults consuming with
youth we’ve done some education of the
school that this is happening we gave
them a heads-up that law enforcement
we’re gonna really be looking at this
just because it is a really serious
issue that we need to educate about we
need to enforce and then this little
sign on the right hand side it got
brought to our attention that there’s
all of our smoking in public places law
signage that required at all doors that
open of all of our businesses but
there’s nothing that talks about
marijuana and public consumption so our
businesses and our downtown core
requested signs that they can put up on
their businesses and help educate people
like it’s not okay to step outside and
smoke a joint outside of Macy’s so
anyway we printed these they’re clear
window clings they just
the inside of a window and they’ve been
really really popular and popular for
our schools have picked them up and
started using them law enforcement some
people have law enforcement I’ve put
them in their vehicles like on their
cars even so they were you know really
organically developed but have become a
nice resource in our community and then
our downtown Spokane businesses also
have started putting posters in their
businesses like the one the bench one
about public consumption has been really
popular we enforce the smoking in public
places law on the business so if they’re
allowing smoking indoors or within 25
feet they’re the ones that get a civil
fine so they recognize that it’s in
their best interest directly to educate
their customers that they can’t light up
right on their patios or outside and
definitely not inside so that’s just
some of the success of I’m launching
this and the other thing that we’ve
really focused on doing is in our in our
county about 500,000 people we have 34
retailers so this campaign we started
I’m going to each and every retailer and
talking to them about about it and so
far I’ve only had one out of all of
those businesses tell me that they
didn’t want the campaign in their store
that business I’m still gonna hit on
three stores so um that’s a tough tough
one to crack but they they just don’t
see it as profitable and I don’t really
see themselves in prevention and that’s
been really interesting to learn about
their perspective and learn about how
our messaging doesn’t you know reside
with them but for everybody else they
have the rack cards and posters that
they give out to customers they put it
usually put them on there like on the
counter but some of them put the rack
card in every single customers purchase
so they’re really trying to make sure
that their customers are complying with
the law and that the industry can be
successful because they’re not known as
people who are driving on the influence
or giving to minors are using in public
so that’s been really interesting and
retailers just requested so some things
on outcomes
one of the things that I wish we could
go back and ask for way more time and
way more money we never did a baseline
assessment of education in our community
so we don’t really know what the
perceptions were we don’t really know
what people’s knowledge of the laws were
we work very closely with our community
but it would have been nice to do some
sort of baseline to be able to do
evaluation now that we’ve had the
campaign implemented for over a year but
we do have some outcomes that have been
really positive and through our efforts
with the downtown Spokane partnership we
were able to decrease public consumption
in the downtown core and that’s all
counted by every single time an
ambassador or law enforcement observes
public consumption so we were able to
see that decrease in the summer time
which is actually one of the I mean it’s
when everyone’s hanging out outside
sitting on patios walking around
downtown so that was really positive and
this spring law enforcement contacted us
again and said can we partner again so
that’s really positive and I think we’re
gonna be able to grow that relationship
a little bit more and then our region we
have health care providers WIC
coalition’s businesses of course all the
retailer’s disseminating it and what I
love about the campaign we know is that
we just haven’t really got any pushback
people are more interested in what’s
coming next because they want to be able
to give this messaging out you know
we’ve got a couple emails here and there
from people about you know we actually
get similar sentiments like you should
focus on alcohol and stuff but with
regards to the campaign we really
haven’t got any negative feedback which
everything else we do I get emails that
I’m like oh I’m sorry so this has been
really positive and I consider that a
big win and then because we were the
first in in our state to do this we’ve
had requests for these materials from
across our state so our Department of
Health is actually working on launching
an adult marijuana prevention campaign
in the next year or so but they still
don’t have it so we’ve been sending this
out and it’s actually used in King
County in simply
so that’s really exciting because they
do everything before us so we’re really
proud of it and then of course our
analytics we’re just really proud that
people continue to come to the site and
get education there so a couple of next
steps for this campaign oh I skipped
ahead on my slide sorry about that but
and we’re gonna continue disseminating
it to retailer stores because we’ve
actually launched the second batch of
this campaign which I’m going to talk
about and we want to evaluate this if we
can get some more funding to do some
sort of evaluation we’d like to do that
and then possibly following Colorado’s
suit and possibly modifying the
campaign’s to work on actual behavior
change rather than just general
awareness and education but we’re going
to need some resources to be able to do
assessment on exactly what our messages
should be and then we’ve also talked a
lot about possibly doing some social
norming campaigns targeted at adults
because we know about misperceptions of
uses that they become a risk factor for
youth for use so when parents perpetuate
that everyone’s doing it that’s
something that we could work on
correcting that misperception and
closing the gap between actual use and
just people’s misperceptions so the
exciting thing about this campaign is
that people really wanted it and one of
the audiences that didn’t feel like they
had all of their needs met with the
original campaign is health care
providers and talking to pregnant
breastfeeding women and then parents of
young children so we have a birth
outcomes taskforce that serves our
County and several counties in our
region and they approached us and asked
if we could partner and expand the
campaign so this was again ahead of our
State Department so we did coordinate
with them and we know that they’re about
to launch a campaign actually this fall
but this was over last fall and winter
so we actually launched ours in the
spring of this year so we may transition
to the state’s campaign and we may
continue using our
but we came up with three new messages
one for pregnancy one for breastfeeding
and one for parenting and they’re
exactly the same in terms of the layout
like they are a little poem and then
they have a message but we changed it
from recommendation or we changed it
from the who what where of responsible
marijuana use to recommendations for
pregnancy breastfeeding and parenting so
we also have a website for this people
can go and learn a little bit more and
we direct them to resources these are
all posters and they’re all those little
rack cards and on the back of the rack
cards when we message tested we learned
that provide health care providers
really wanted three bullet points on the
back of the rack cards there’s three
bullet points pertaining to each topic
so that a healthcare provider can
quickly grab the resource and have a
conversation with a patient so this was
mostly disseminated through anyone who
serves Children and Families state
agencies included our WIC offices and
healthcare providers throughout our
region and this again was requested by
our partners in King County so we know
that we’ve filled a gap that is
temporary in our state but nonetheless
it was really important for us to do
this message we tested these again with
pregnant women specifically women who
are marijuana users and what I found
most interesting about that is we didn’t
get any negative feedback they said we
need to have this conversation a lot of
them disclose that they do use marijuana
during pregnancy to cope with morning
sickness and they really want to know
more information but a lot of them it’s
something that’s been passed down as
generations like they say only my family
did this or you know my brothers and
sisters do this and nobody’s had at me
anything bad happened to them so they
were all really supportive and we really
didn’t get any negative feedback about
this funny enough and we are a public
health agency when we launched this we
got more pushback about the conversation
transitioned to whether or not we should
be promoting immunizations and our
community so we were like oh nobody’s
playing attention to no I was mad at us
about us telling them to get their flu
shot so overall it’s been pretty
successful
and maybe we’ll add to it maybe we won’t
because the state’s gonna launch their
campaign this one again we had people
spend over two minutes on our website
and also had a actually a higher
click-through rate than our original
campaigns when people saw this targeted
digital ad they’re really likely to
click and learn a little bit more so on
here I just put both websites so if
that’s of interest to you go ahead click
on on the link and then you can download
the resources so we print them on like a
cardstock but they’re all there we’ve
tried to make them really accessible for
anyone to use and then if this is
something that you’re interested in
using in your community or in any of the
groups that you work with we want to
make sure that that’s easy for you to do
so you can shoot me an email and I’ll
connect you with our communications
department they’ll just help you come up
with some text to make sure you know we
attribute our graphic designer that we
use but otherwise it’s something that we
want to make sure there’s a resource for
others so I’m happy to answer questions
or share more about it after as well I
think I’m going to turn it over to Sam
good morning everybody my name is Sam :
with the Colorado Department of
Transportation and I oversee the
development and implementation of our
campaign to raise awareness around the
dangers of driving hi one of our
important partners on a creative agency
is in the audience here from Amelie and
they have been instrumental in helping
us roll out this campaign and I think
they would agree this has just been an
amazing and incredibly fun campaign to
work on I never really had an interest
in the show madman before I started
working on our campaign and now it’s my
favorite show and sometimes I think of
myself as Don Draper but you know but
that beans that being said you know this
is a really really serious issue driving
high is killing people in Colorado and
it’s no small task that we need to stop
the trend and we need to reduce the
number of fatalities that we’re seeing
we get a fairly small amount only about
four hundred and fifty thousand dollars
of state marijuana tax money to roll out
this campaign that only allows us to be
a market for a month or two for the
whole year the good news is the state is
going to be doubling on the amount of
money that we get we’ll get close to a
million dollars in 2018 to raise
awareness on this on this issue
the Health Department and Ally’s
campaign they really don’t talk much
about this she’s you know and I think
it’s a great relationship she talks
about other things and we just have a
single campaign around around driving
high that we’ve rolled out literally
since within a few months of the first
recreational stores opening in Colorado
which I found really remarkable so let’s
begin
so before those recreational stores
opened in 2014 we made sure to do some
focus groups just to find out what was
going on in the heads of marijuana users
and they told us basically four things
they thought they were differ different
penalties for drugs versus alcohol when
it came to dry
and getting a DUI they didn’t think the
laws were in effect they didn’t think
that marijuana really applied to the DUI
law they thought that marijuana was
safer to use and drive than alcohol and
actually they still really do believe
that it’s a real problem in that they
wouldn’t respond well to a heavy-handed
government message so tactics that we’ve
used over the year include paid
advertising partnerships with
dispensaries that marijuana industry
group rideshare companies we can use
guerrilla tactics or PR stunts basically
in the community to really produce some
good earned media stories for us
of course the target are people most at
risk of driving high and that’s males 21
to 34 years old the way we measure
success in the program is through a
driver survey that we roll out every
November in Colorado it goes to all
drivers in the state but there’s usually
about a hundred who self-identify as
marijuana users and then we ask them you
know how often you drive high in that
sort of thing we do a pre and post
survey around our campaign just to find
out if people saw the campaign in market
we measure this by the number of paid ad
impressions the number of news stories
we’re getting about our our campaign we
look at the engagement on social media
and of course we look at the fatality
data and the do DUI arrests and I’ll
just take a pause there and look at that
and it’s going up this is where our huge
concern is especially if you look at
that pie chip I’m sorry the bar chart
there on the right those are crashes
fatalities that involve active THC only
active THC can cause impairment and
seventy-seven fatalities involved active
THC in 2016 and of those 77 51 actually
we’re at or above our legal limit in
Colorado which is five nanograms just to
give you some perspective that 51 is
about 8% of all fatalities in the state
and also to give you more perspective
about a third of our fatalities are
related to alcohol so not a big and not
as big of Brahmas alcohol but still a
growing problem that we are really
really concerned about so back to our
campaigns when we first started
launching this campaign we looked at
this process of behavioral changes to
figure out where people were and it was
became quite obvious that they were
really in the awareness and learning
stage they really needed to know what
the DUI law was and then he didn’t know
more about the dangers of driving hi so
kind of some of the guiding principles
that we’ve used for the campaign is that
yes users do not want to feel
criminalized that we would take a
neutral stance we did in education the
law and its dangers as you rolled out
these campaigns and that we needed to
connect to users and get them to trust
us I mean the year before was you know
heavy-handed government you know you can
get arrested for possessing and using
marijuana and now everything’s okay as
long as you don’t drive high and so
there wasn’t there wasn’t that trust
with government so messaging coming from
government was as proven a little
challenging so our initial approach to
your advertising was HK people very
simple that you can get a DUI for
driving hi our tone was you can do a lot
of things you can bake a cake you can
mow your lawn you can you know wash your
dog but just don’t do any dust don’t get
in the car and drive hi so we called it
drive hi get a DUI and we made it
humorous and light-hearted this is one
of the ads from the beginning
so you know this does not look like a an
ad that you would see from a government
agency which was the whole purpose of
this but since then we’ve really kind of
taken more of a serious approach to our
ads these are some billboards that have
gone up next near dispensaries in along
the Front Range showing crashed cars
looking like marijuana joints showing a
grinder with a crashed car in it this is
a an ad targeting the spanic community
if you light this one up don’t like this
don’t start this
don’t drive high so much more much more
serious and but we still want to have a
little bit of fun so we developed this
ad which which ran online 19% of duis in
Colorado are for marijuana why
because marijuana impairs reaction time
reaction time is important as proven by
the fact that you can’t catch this skip
ad button
marijuana’s decreases your reaction time
making you an unsafe driver
if you’re high don’t drive so definitely
more of a serious approach than that
first video that we saw then talking
about these guerrilla tactics and stunts
that we’ve done in the community this
has been a really important effort and
to produce some news stories and getting
the news interested the first two
vehicles up there that’s our hot boxing
car we retrofitted it with a smoking
machine we would take it to ball games
or downtown Denver or 420 events and
park it and then remotely with a little
remote across the street we’d turn on
the smoke machine and the car would
start to fill with smoke the windows
were a little bit cracked open so the
smoke would start to come out and people
kind of thought there people are getting
high in there before the concert or
whatever and then the smoke dissipates
little fan comes on and in bright neon
Drive high get a DUI people just kind of
were blown away by that so it was always
a big surprise then we also did this
bottom one was called the slow speed
chase which we wrapped two vehicles one
to look like a cop car and the other one
to look like everybody every marijuana
users dream car at a big marijuana leaf
on it and we just drove it slowly very
slowly around concert venues and 420
events just a very just to drive home
that message that yes law enforcement is
trained and they are going to arrest
stoned drivers so don’t think that they
won’t we also had fun with some of the
dispensaries putting these arcade games
we took these old arcade games and
retrofitted them you walk up to it if
you’re in a dispensary and you think oh
I want to play this racing game but we
we retrofitted it with this message it
says C dot reminds you playing video
games while high is legal driving is not
please pick a non driving game basically
so kind of a tongue-in-cheek way of
reminding people they shouldn’t be
driving high we also did a cannabis quiz
cab at near on one of the 4/20 events we
had this Jenga block set with all sorts
of marijuana messaging on it at another
event so just diving a little bit deeper
into our most recent campaign for 2017
this is kind of how our budget would
divide up
a significant amount went to digital
outreach because you can get so targeted
with digital if you’re trying to reach
marijuana users
then we did a lot of out-of-home with
some of these billboards located near
dispensaries as well as getting posters
and that sort of thing and dispensaries
and of course not forgetting about the
Hispanic audience about 20% of
Coloradans are Hispanic it was a
partnership with lyft we launched the
3:20 movement just like 420 is about
having a good time for marijuana users
we wanted 320 to be when you plan for a
ride we wanted 320 to be now known for
safety planning a ride
and so lyft partnered with us offering
discounts as an incentive for people to
plan for a safe ride if they’re getting
high they wrapped 17 of their vehicles
17 percent of duis in Colorado related
to marijuana and so leading up to 420
this is just a great way to remind
people about and actually thrive people
towards behavior change we’re kind of
hoping that now they know about the law
and now they know about dangers are kind
of hoping now they’ll be ready for some
behavior change to actually plan for a
safe ride but they’re not entirely there
yet so so we promoted this 320 campaign
we had a website with all sorts of data
on there on the dangers of driving high
you had to go to the website in order to
download the discount lyft coupon and
then we drove people to the website with
different digital banners a lot of these
digital banners were geo-targeted it’s
in dispensaries so if you went in a
dispensary and you’re on your phone this
geo this is dad may come up reminding
you about the 3:20 movement and the lyft
discounts I talked a little bit before
about the stunts that we’re doing one of
them involved this crashed edible this
was a 500-pound half crashed car half
edible and then we all just we had a
street team right there too you can kind
of see the side of the table we brought
this to
various events the concert here at
Method Man and Redman at Red Rocks up at
Morrison 420 on the on the Block party
bringing this they’re getting people to
and you know it’s such an eye-catching
thing getting people to engage about the
dangers of driving driving high
especially edibles when people aren’t
really familiar with the fact that
you’re high won’t hit until an hour or
two after you do the edible and that
could be a real recipe for disaster if
you’re if you’re driving the other
tactic we you know you cannot go
anywhere in Colorado and find a 420 Road
sign because they’re highly coveted so
we thought what a great idea to hide
some of these to have we had a hundred
printed up just kind of miniature 420
road signs and we hid them at various
marijuana events and then we pushed out
on social media hey take a look for the
road signs and we find one bring it to
our street team and we’ll give you a
discount for for writing lyft and it
also allowed our street team to engage
and educate people around the dangers of
driving high and again we did this at
420 events the concerts anything with
any event that we thought was going to
be popular with marijuana users and then
this is a Window Cling
that appeared in a lot of dispensaries
130 dispensaries across across the state
plan a ride before you take a hit 17
percent of DUI arrests in Colorado
involve marijuana and we did as I
mentioned a lot of targeting on social
media this is kind of how we targeted
people following people with these
interests is how we targeted
dispensaries bars cannabis because you
can’t just go on social media and say
you want to target marijuana users
that’s that’s I think pretty impossible
to do but if you target these interests
you can pretty much get to them and then
we pushed all this messaging out on paid
ad and organic posts a little bit of a
sample of the feedback that we got from
people they really did like the campaign
especially the mile marker campaign and
they really did engage with us around
and some of the messaging around the
dangers of driving high engagement rate
of almost 4% is is really high so that’s
way above industry average and
click-through eighth of a percent and a
half is also very high so people were
really really engaged with us they
thought our creativity was spot-on and
they we had lots of likes shares
comments and that whole thing and this
produced a lot of earned media which is
adds a lot of value to this campaign you
know just over a hundred stories online
from the tactics that we did last summer
or last summer that has a value of over
a million and a half dollars so we’re
just really pleased with that it was
just great free advertising for our for
our efforts and and then also some of
these handouts in dispensaries you know
with every purchase you would get a this
this little flyer taped in your bag
about the dangers of driving high and
then for dispensaries that had video
capabilities they might have a screen
advertising their latest product a lot
of dispensaries actually given us
permission to to run these I actually
drive better when I’m high
and you know it’s really the
relationship dispensaries has been great
you know it’s bad PR for the for the
marijuana industry to see fatalities
increase so they really want to educate
their customers and this other one sells
are pretty good the police can’t tell
that I’m driving high so having those
loop at dispensaries has been really
really great so some of our achievements
in that I’ll go for challenges and then
I’ll finish up so yeah lots of digital
impressions over 35 million out-of-home
and digital 3,800 people redeemed or
retrieved the discount codes from lyft
lots of good presence at our events
other achievements 91% of marijuana
users now know that you can get a DUI
for driving hi and this is a general
population so this very high 46%
awareness of our cam campaigns a lot of
people knew a lot of people saw our tag
lines and our campaigns and markets so
that’s really encouraging challenges
even though people know about the law
it’s not changing their behavior it’s
not leading to safer choices over 50% of
marijuana users say they’ve driven high
on an average of 10 times in the last
month fatalities are increasing and so
are DUIs
so our recommendations from our Highway
Safety Office first and foremost get
your data in order make sure you’re
tracking active THC and your fatalities
even before legalization save that
before and after comparison as well as
in your your DUI arrests make sure
identify funding where that’s going to
come from to Train law enforcement to
roll out your public education campaign
hire very qualified advertising experts
such as Amelie
and do your proper research and of
course develop trust with users in the
community that’s it any sort if you
wanted to see my slides or any questions
that’s my email address although I think
we might taking questions now thanks all
right well we would love to entertain
some questions if anyone wants to to get
at us any takers
all right I’ll throw one out there oh
there we go what avenues did you utilize
to determine your baseline of where the
community stood on how they the law
around DUI yeah it was the it was our
survey that we did every November that
goes out to drivers across the state and
then marijuana users are always a subset
of those and we’ve been doing that
survey for many years so anyone else
can I jump in there actually so we did a
survey as well that reinforces his
results we have a panel of adults about
1,500 adults across the state and
similar results when we were attesting
knowledge of a variety of different
either what do your outreach
organizations need from Steve Mulder’s
lake dispensaries in order to flourish
should be successful
I think we can probably all address that
but the relationships with industry have
been huge I mean that is obviously where
our audiences as consumers they’re in
these stores especially for out-of-state
visitors there’s a lot of education that
can happen in store and I think what’s
been really fun and nice to see is both
the state campaign messaging that’s been
developed as well as city level stuff
that we’ve provided to industry to use
they have not only utilized that but
they’ve developed some of their own
stuff they’d like to have maybe some
branded materials and things like that
as Sam mentioned they’re the last ones
that want to see irresponsible use by
their customers it’s going to reflect
really poorly on them but we have to
build that relationship and we have to
provide them again with incredible
information that they’re gonna be
willing to share with their users you
know we even have somebody from the
marijuana industry group on the DUI Task
Force which is very high-level
government I’m sorry governor’s office
Task Force on DUI in Colorado and
somebody from marijuana stories on there
so yeah marijuana education Oversight
Committee includes representatives of
the industry the medical industry but I
think for me the biggest lesson learning
was trust building with the industry and
users it wasn’t popular at first have
messaging targeting users directly it
was more well everyone needs to know
that and but really who needs to know
about safe storage not the general
public users need to know about safe
storage thing things like that so
building trust with the industry with
users and
credible resource that government wasn’t
just going to wag our finger in their
faces
related to marijuana legalization and
then I think another part of that
relationship is that you should be a
little more delicate with was tourism
the tourism for good reason Colorado has
really great reasons to come here not
just marijuana and so how do you reach
tart tourists specifically with
information on what the laws are they
don’t know when they come here
seth rogen posted but like right when
legalization happened one of his movies
was gonna be screened at a theater and
he was coming here for it and he’s like
everyone come get high with me at the
theater it’s like yeah that’s illegal
um you can’t do that just because we
legalized doesn’t mean you can do
anything so how do you reach them in a
very narrow window without advertising
marijuana as a reason to come and and
that misperception when you start adding
your ads in there to people who are
planning a trip to Colorado it was it’s
delicate
so this is a question for Sam those are
some impressive statistics 212 million
impressions is a lot 90% of people aware
the DUI you can get a DUI that’s great
but it hasn’t affected the behavior at
all what are you gonna do next so we are
looking into some new tactics this next
year we may kind of abandon the
traditional ad campaign and do more of a
community engagement campaign across the
state where we have digital town hall
meetings real-life town hall meetings
bringing in partners from all walks of
life bringing in the general public
really elevating the conversation to get
everybody talking about about this you
know about why people are why people are
driving hi
what sort of misinformation and do they
have what would it take for us to
convince them not to drive hi so it’s
going to be kind of a classic PR public
engagement campaign
in a way yes I mean there’s the there’s
the myth that people who drive high or
driving slow and are being careful but
in reality that’s not true you know that
you talk to law enforcement they are
driving recklessly they are endangering
themselves they’re endangering other
people on the road and their their
perception of time distance and speed is
very impaired so when they pull out pull
into an intersection and they look down
the road that car may be a lot closer
that they’re about to pull out in front
of in fact I know there’s a one in
happened in Denver last year a guy –
higher than a kite pull it out into an
intersection didn’t realize how close
the car was coming down the road and
t-boned him and his girlfriend died I
mean so I mean I think some of this does
happen maybe this is just a guess of
mine that maybe people do drive slower
or there’s a perception that they’re
driving slower when they’re only a
mildly high that’s just me thinking like
I could be totally wrong about that
maybe it’s the people who are higher
than a kite that are driving recklessly
I don’t know because I hear both things
but you talk in law enforcement that’s
investigating the crashes and they say
these people are reckless and they’re
speeding from a research standpoint in
the big manual of all the research
they’ve done don’t quote me on this but
it’s something alcohol increases your
risk of a fatal crash something like
marijuana’s only doubles its your risk
of a fatal crash and so people say
marijuana safer than alcohols like it’s
not safe for the sober you’re still
doubling your risk of a fatal crash and
so comparing those two substances is
really dangerous and then many times
people don’t just have one on board they
have both on board which is it’s a it
magnifies the impairing effect it’s it
is exponential when you have both on
board
you’re more impaired than either alone
and the research does support that it
has to be done through a blood
toxicology test there’s no Road side
device that we have in Colorado to to
measure impairment caused by marijuana
hey one thing that came to my mind is
that sometimes consumers don’t have a
ton of education about the proper ways
to use cannabis and the laws around
cannabis except for at the point of sale
if you’re not familiar with in the laws
I chatted with a retailer about what
advice do you give your customers about
where to consume cannabis and they
literally told me well you know we know
it’s not legal to consume in public but
the police don’t really enforce it so oh
that’s what we tell them and I was
thinking about ways to maybe combat that
without being too pushy and they already
have literature at the front that
they’re required by the state to have so
I guess rambling question but my my
question is how is it in your view the
best way to engage with business owners
to kind of articulate to them it’s
important that they play an important
role in educating consumers and not that
they have to but that would be great if
they could again striking that balance
you’ll need a Sun so in Colorado they’re
actually not required to have any
literature at point of sale a lot of
them do again for the exact same reasons
they’re invested in a safe legal
responsible message and that’s a really
hard one so we have a responsible vendor
program within the state that tries to
educate vendors how to talk about
cannabis at point of sale includes have
they educate on the law things like that
but they’re not required to do any of
that
there are pros and cons sometimes
requiring doesn’t necessarily improve
when there’s not really teeth for
enforcement it doesn’t improve what’s
happening actually a point of sale but
that’s the exact same problem as Paige
pointed out the law of no public use
doesn’t really work unless someone
enforces it if everyone knows no one’s
enforcing it and a lot of times they’re
enforcing it either because they don’t
think public knows or I’ve heard from a
lot of law enforcement that they don’t
enforce it because there’s no legal
place to use and so if we haven’t given
homeless people if we haven’t given
tourists if we haven’t given you know
renters an option if their landlord says
they can’t use at home then where else
are they going to use and
or it might be a tourism thing we don’t
want to give tourists a really bad
experience by getting a ticket while
they’re in the state and so enforcement
is really the biggest challenge and so
doing that community work to figure out
why is enforcement not happening and
then how can we then actually speak with
authority of these are the laws and
here’s why and for a lot of our
communities that are doing communities
that care for them it’s about changing
community norms we don’t want using
public because we don’t want kids to see
it who cares if it’s legal or illegal
that’s why the law was originally passed
who cares if you’re going to get a
ticket or not it was passed because we
don’t want it modeled in front of youth
and so that’s the direction they’re
taking more than enforcement I think
it’s a turn-off for dispensaries to hand
out to government branded information so
we are now working with suspensory
saying you know the best person a
dispensary talked to you about the
dangers and proper use is your bud
tender so so we’re trying to you know
we’re trying to train bud tenders or
trying to get dispensaries to actually
talk to customers about this but we’re
also you know giving them kind of a
blank slate on putting out collateral
material I’m just saying you know if you
want to just take this basic information
and we’ll help you just brand it so it
looks like it’s coming from you it looks
like this fliers coming from you and not
from a state agency they’re really
receptive to that even helping them
develop a web page on their website
devoted to safety that looks like it’s
just from them we’ve also done given
those tools to the enforcement officers
themselves whether they’re police
officers patrolling for public
consumption or bringing in volunteers as
part of the
police department to help kind of
distribute that information and our
problem area so to speak the other thing
is we gave our Park Rangers here in
Denver authority to write those public
consumption civil infraction tickets but
their first step in any engagement is
going to be that education piece before
they go to that so it really takes
everyone I would just add at the local
level when we started our read to no
campaign we went and met with some
retailers and they wanted something that
was nice and presentable for their
storefronts we have these they come look
just like a plastic holder with rack
cards in them they want them to be
fairly small and they wanted it to be so
easy so we actually call them and ask if
they need a refill and we go there and
drop off materials are mailed them like
we make it so that they don’t have to do
anything except make them available so
taking it the work out they already have
so many things that they have to
regulate and be aware of that the easier
the better
good I can’t speak to that
so yeah Denver International Airport’s
obviously our main hub here and there is
essentially an amnesty policy in place
where people are encouraged to get rid
of whatever they have before they travel
and people do get caught with that
security also in luggage checks there
have been zero arrests for it at DEA so
obviously we’re talking about small
quantities the first step with people is
education get rid of it we’re not
detaining folks for for small amounts
and the number of fractions I think it
was like 50 the first year and another
20 in the bag checks so it hasn’t been a
huge problem people leave it behind in
their hotel rooms people leave it behind
in their rental cars so we work with
those agencies on education as well but
so yes people are traveling with it but
it is not something where we’re
detaining folks has a Dropbox so you can
it’s actually a locked box on sites we
can drop all marijuana in the drop box
securely on your way out of the airport
there’s not international airports or
covered by the FAA and so we’ve got some
hurdles there the tourism offices will
say there’s a tourism office on the way
out I think it’s the one out I 70 they
get a lot of weed left at their door
front as people are driving out of the
state seriously and they don’t know what
to do with it and then they’re concerned
that then they’re in violation of state
law because they are possessing more
than an ounce because it’s being left
there and so they people pretty much
knows a lot we’ve had to do a lot of
Education with service industry because
of it being left in hotel rooms
you’ve non-english speakers seeing a
bunch of candy that’s not that’s still
sealed left in a room so there has been
some instances of overdose um incidences
of unintentional exposure for youth
we’re a non-english-speaking
hotel employee we’ll take the product
Tommy gets their children not realizing
that marijuana
open it but it’s not sealed and throw it
in the trash what it’s not visible
no not that I’m aware of and you were
the science is so far behind alcohol on
this I mean even the five nanogram limit
for Colorado isn’t really an
evidence-based limit so no I mean the
tools are that we have for alcohol we
don’t have their marijuana some of the
research for example that have been done
is done on much lower concentrations and
if you usually only done on more novice
users not experienced users so we have
general times for instance it can take
four hours after consuming edible
products to reach maximum blood
concentration so then how do you tell
someone when it’s safe to drive after
eating if it can take up to four an hour
it still reaches what maximum blood
concentration you know using trying to
find the exact ones but using over I
think it’s 15 milligrams for a novice
user does
significantly impaired their driving
wouldn’t test positive but again that’s
just a novice so when your anatomy male
versus female and you metabolize
differently it really depends what
you’ve eaten and how you metabolize just
based on their chemistry like high fat
content foods how it’s absorbed in their
body its
no no but I’m sure there are
dose-response to impairment about like
we’re of the studies were funding within
this data
I know a lot of carousel
many of your campaigns touch college
campuses
relationship with the college
about rolling that out too
that’s a great question so the Kaede
college alcohol and drug education I
believe is what their that stands for
they’re also on our Advisory Committee
they a lot of campuses do their own
advertising related to drug and alcohol
so they haven’t consumed as many of our
resources as much as they try and use
their own messaging their own avenues to
able to disseminate that information
it’s really quite tricky the nuanced
laws it’s a drug felony to give
marijuana to anyone underage if you’re
more than two years older than them and
so with the ages of college students
there’s just some really tricky nuances
to educating about the law so they Kaede
receives funding from our office of
behavioral health which they use for
some of their own campus level education
we do make all of our resources and
materials available to them we’ve placed
ads in their in their newsletters and on
campus when when we’re approached by
them because we want it to work within
what they’re already doing for alcohol
and drug education and not trying you
know with our state budget trample on
their the work that they’re trying to do
at that local level on the campus so
it’s much more of a partnership in that
way
to come back to that education and it
made me realize that while the science
is also a bit unsophisticated still so
are the consumers and so we need to
continue encouraging people to start
slowly with edibles and concentrates and
be careful in their usage so thanks to
my co-presenters here for being here
today and thank you all we’ve got a
lunch break for the next hour and a half
so go outside I think it’s another
beautiful day and breakout start up
again at 1:15 if you’d like any you can
steal some of our retailer education and
tourism and clinical guidelines
link

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