How Far Should Smoking Bans Go?


Smoking is bad for the kids, but just how
far should we go with these smoking bans? Hey smoking hot peeps! Yea that didn’t work did it? Hi I’m Trace. Thanks for watching Dnews. Cigarettes are little paper-wrapped tobacco
sticks, but they’re also full of death. If you’ve been anywhere near a classroom or
television in the last few decades, you’ve likely seen ads advocating for quitting smoking. Forty of the United States have laws banning
smoking in public places in some capacity. In spite of the contentious debate over smoking
bans, studies in Europe have found no real evidence of positive or negative impact on
people’s subjective well-being under those bans. So are they helpful? Fifty years ago half of all American adults
smoke cigarettes. Today, it’s only one in five. Sounds pretty good. Smokers who want to quit told researchers
in Europe public bans helped keep them from smoking. Plus, there are over 250 chemical in secondhand
smoke and numerous studies showing the damage it can cause. Personally and subjectively, I love going
home after a night at the bar without having everything I’m wearing smelling like smoke. That is nice. In a new national poll conducted by the University
of Michigan, 87 percent of adults polled are in favor of going one step further from a
public smoking ban and actually banning smoking in cars where there are children. Officially there are already some states that
ban smoking in cars with kids including Arkansas, Louisiana, California, and Maine. Is there a health benefit for the kids? Very much so. There are numerous studies showing that children
exposed to environmental tobacco smoke experience increased rates of lower respiratory illness,
middle ear effusion, asthma and even sudden infant death syndrome or SIDS. But the cars man, was the cars that really
was a shocker for me. A study by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School
of Public Health states that secondhand smoke is higher in cars than it ever was. In even smoky bars and restaurants prior to
those bans. To prove this, they sampled the air in cars
with smokers and non-smokers over a period of 24 hours. In those where one to three cigarettes were
smoked, airborne concentrations of nicotine were 72 times higher than in smoke-free cars. Study say the chemicals from smoke permeate
car upholstery causing third-hand smoke or residual secondhand smoke. And statistically, people who smoke and drive
have a higher risk of car crashes resulting in injury and death. This brings up an interesting conversation.
As second hand smoke have no safe levels, thats reiterated across many studies, when
do the laws stop? As of now there are no national laws regulating
smoking in a confined space, like a car. Is this a step too far to start doing so? If we ban smoking in our own cars, what about
your house? If there are kids around, is it going to be
banned there too? Where’s the line? Share your thoughts at Facebook.com/dnews
or Twitter.com/dnews and we look forward to hearing from you. Thanks, see ya.

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