GWTG CAD 20170920 1658 1

GWTG   CAD 20170920 1658 1


– [Host] Hey everybody, we’ll get started.
Welcome to American Heart Association’s
Get with the Guidelines
CAD webinar series.
Educational webinars
are being brought to you
by the southwest affiliate show committee.
For a full list of all
the upcoming webinars,
visit www.heart.org/swaquality.
Before we get started,
we would like to go over
a few health items.
To avoid background noise,
all lines have been placed on mute.
For questions, you can unmute
your line by pressing *6
or type in the Q&A section of WebEx.
All slides and handouts
will be sent to attendees
within a week of the call.
Please also visit www.heart.org/swaquality
to view the recording of today’s webinar.
At this time, I will turn
it over to Loni Denne,
Regional VP of Quality
and Systems Improvement
for the American Heart Association
to introduce today’s speaker.
– [Loni] Good morning everyone.
I just want to do a quick sound check.
Ben or Kristen, could you come off mute
by hitting *6, and let us
know if you can hear us okay.
– [Dan] Hey Loni, this is
Ben, I can hear you just fine.
– Okay, perfect, thank you!
– Yep.
– [Kristen] Hi, this is Kristen.
– [Loni] Great, thank you so much.
I’m Loni Denne.
I’m the Regional VP for
Quality and Systems Improvement
and Mission: Lifeline for
the southwest affiliate.
I’m gonna kick off the webinar,
and then I’m gonna pass it to Ben
to talk about EMS and Mission: Lifeline,
and then Kristen Waller
is going to finish up
by really talking about the details
of Get with the Guidelines
Coronary Artery Disease,
the registry itself, how to run reports,
how to receive recognition
or keep your recognition.
So, I just want to thank everyone
for taking the time to
join us for this discussion
about the American Heart Association
Get with the Guidelines
Coronary Artery Disease
and Mission: Lifeline Initiative today.
As I said, the webinar is being hosted
by the southwest affiliate,
the American Heart Association,
and our staff covers the
states of Arkansas, Colorado,
New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, and Wyoming.
Slide please.
Thank you.
I wanted to provide an overview
of our suite of quality initiatives.
This slide that you’re looking at now
provides a snapshot of
all of our programs.
We have a Get with the
Guidelines Stroke, Heart Failure,
Resuscitation, AFIB, and
Coronary Artery Disease
Quality Initiative for hospitals.
The Mission: Lifeline
program for communities
that provides recognition
for eligible EMS agencies
and hospitals as well as cardiac
accreditation for hospitals
and targets blood pressure
and cholesterol programs for clinics.
So, what is Get with the Guidelines?
We have this tremendous
body of science and research
that sees, the patient care guidelines,
but putting it into
practice in the real world
can take a very long time.
So our program helps speed up the time
that it takes to bring the
guidelines to the bedside.
We offer the data collection
tools that allow hospitals
to track your guideline adherence,
and we heavily subsidize the registry
to make it more affordable
for hospitals to participate,
and we provide multiple opportunities
for you to market your work
if you are providing guidelines safe care.
Slide please.
So we are so very excited
about our most recent Mission:
Lifeline program change.
Get with the Guidelines
Coronary Artery Disease
is the new data source for
Mission: Lifeline moving forward.
Get with the Guidelines CAD
is what we call it for short,
supports our Mission:
Lifeline systems of care work.
It involved EMS providers,
referring hospitals,
and receiving hospitals.
Previously, the action
registry was a data source
for Mission: Lifeline.
We will not longer be using
the ACTION Registry data
for Mission: Lifeline.
Moving forward, Get
with the Guidelines CAD
will be the sole data source
for Mission: Lifeline hospital reports,
Mission: Lifeline regional reports,
and Mission: Lifeline recognition.
Next slide please.
With the release of Get
with the Guidelines CAD,
we are able to provide
Mission: Lifeline hospital
and regional reports and analysis
for Mission: Lifeline
recognition in real time.
There will be more waiting
for quarterly reports to drop,
months after, after the data is relevant,
and no waiting for weekly data uploads.
The instant your patient data is entered,
you’re able to run your report,
and the patient data is
reflected in the report.
This year marks the 10th
anniversary of Mission: Lifeline.
We have been working with
doctors, nurses, paramedics,
departments of health, and
other health care professionals
in communities throughout the
country for the past 10 years.
We coordinate heart attack
and stroke patient treatments.
The American Heart
Association started this work.
Regions and states have decreased the time
it takes to get patients to hospitals,
route them to the most
appropriate hospital,
and ensure that each patient is treated
based on the latest
research when they arrive.
Thank you, and congratulations to everyone
that has been involved
with Mission: Lifeline
and their work over the past 10 years.
Slide please.
So, the pricing for Get
with the Guidelines CAD
is in front of you.
It’s completely free in 2017.
It will allow you, the tool will allow you
to have full functionality,
to pull your real-time
Mission: Lifeline report, measures,
Kristen’s gonna go into it in more detail
later in the webinar.
If you’re able to enroll by November 1st,
you receive a $500 discount
on a 2018 annual enrollment fee.
There will be no additional charge
for the Chest Pain Accreditation
data layer and reports.
And there’s a 50 percent discount
for Critical Access Hospitals
and a 10 percent discount
for Corporate Health Systems
that enroll 10 or more sites
under a single invoice.
Pricing options are listed here.
Under option one, you’ll see that,
for hospitals who wish to
directly enter their patient data
into the online tool,
there’s a $500 discount
for early enrollment.
It will be for 2018 $2,750.
And for those hospitals enrolling
after November 1st, $3,250.
For hospitals that choose option two
and data entry the vendor, we’re providing
an additional discount, so that, you know,
we realize that hospitals
will most likely have a few
associated with a vendor upload,
and so we wanted to have
some, a little bit of savings
to you by offering an additional discount,
$2500 before November 1st and
$3,000 after November 1st.
We have a third option for
hospitals who want just one
quarterly report, a snapshot
of how their hospital is
performing once a quarter
or the regional report once a quarter,
so regions that are utilizing the tools
for their regional STEMI data.
That will be free if a
hospital enrolls in the option
before November 1st and
$900 after November 1st.
How to enroll, so we’ve
made it really easy.
There’s a website where you
can just do everything online.
You just click on the enrolled day tab,
go through the agreement,
and make your choices,
and then you’ll receive an email
from the third-party vendor who runs
the Get with the Guidelines
CAD registry to welcome you
into this system and just
set you up for training
so that you can start
entering your patient data.
The URL is listed here.
You can also just Google
Get with the Guidelines
Coronary Artery Disease,
and it will pull up that way as well.
The vendors that have already
applied and been approved
for Get with the Guidelines
CAD are listed here,
and we have many additional vendors.
If you don’t see you
vendor here on the list,
now that we have many additional vendors
who are in the process of signing up
to become approved vendor.
And I wanted you to be aware
of an exciting announcement
and update that we received recently
about our tool being an
approved data solution
for Chest Pain Center accreditation.
This is offered by ACC
accreditation services
and also want you to be aware
that we do have accreditation,
that we have partnered
with the American College of Cardiology
on cardiac accreditation.
One is our Mission: Lifeline
accreditation for hospitals
for receiving centers or referral centers,
and the other one is our
newest accreditation,
and that is CVCOE, or Cardiac
Vascular Center of Excellence
accreditation that is in partnership
with the American College of Cardiology.
And with that, I’m gonna pass
the baton to Ben Leonard.
He is a paramedic, and
he is Director of Quality
and Systems Improvement for Wyoming
and New Mexico in El Paso.
– [Ben] Hi folks, thanks Loni!
Great presentation and really
appreciate the highlights.
You can go ahead and go
to the next slide please.
We thought it would be valuable today
to really encompass this,
you know, systems of care
component to include
the EMS side of things.
Just so we can pass the information along
to the hospital counterparts,
which are, you know,
you guys are on this call,
just to see what exactly
is entailed with the EMS
component for the recognition
and then Mission: Lifeline participation.
So this first slide is
just a little snippet
of the history, as Loni mentioned,
we are celebrating our 10 year anniversary
for the Mission: Lifeline
program, launched in 2007.
In 2001, the American Heart
Association was partnered
with the ACTION Registry, I’m sorry, 2011.
We were using the ACTION
Registry Get with the Guidelines
as the data source for the
Mission: Lifeline reports,
but as Loni mentioned, and Kristen will go
into greater detail, that
change has happened recently.
We’re now utilizing the
Get with the Guidelines
Coronary Artery Disease program
for the data news for Mission: Lifeline.
And so we’re really excited for that,
for those highlights
that Loni had mentioned,
you know, there’s a lot of the hurdles
that were faced by the EMS agencies
and the hospital counterparts
in terms of, you know,
timeliness of getting the
data and returns being usable
in the system meetings.
So really, really exciting news for that.
The hospital recognition offered in 2010
and then EMS recognition was
offered subsequently in 2014.
You can hit the next button please.
The EMS recognition and the
hospital recognition’s really
focused, I guess, I’m
sorry, the EMS recognition
really focus along the guidelines
that were announced in 2013,
and I’m sure we’re all familiar with this
where ultimately it should
maintain a regional system
of STEMI care as it states
out the assessments,
quality improvements,
as well as performance
of a 12 lead ECG in the
field by EMS personnel.
As you’ll see here in just a second,
that high-level overview,
the required measures
for EMS recognition, most
of the measures are focused
around these two recommendations,
which as you can see,
they’re past one level to
that Level of Evidence: B
for both of these.
So it’s really, really,
important and beneficial
for communities as well as EMS agencies
to grasp the concept of Mission: Lifeline
and move forward with improving outcomes.
Next slide please.
As you can see, so this
is kind of a busy slide,
and I apologize.
The required measures for recognition
really kind of determine
on the capabilities
that the hospital has
that the EMS agency is transporting to.
So if their primary chest pain location
is a STEMI receiving
facility, the EMS agency,
they’re required to report
on the four measures
in this box here for the STEMI receiving.
As I mentioned earlier, you know,
three of the four are
really focused around
lowering that lead ECG, more
or less screening our patients,
the ones that are having STEMI,
and the final measure is
really the system nature
of how well we’re functioning as a whole
with our pre-ops sometimes as
well as the hospital times,
and even sending them
into the in-hospital times
between the emergency department-
– Hey Ben?
– Yes?
– [Loni] I’m so sorry to interrupt you.
We are, your reception is a little cloudy.
– Okay, I’m sorry.
– You’re breaking up
a little bit (laughs).
– [Ben] That’s okay, I apologize for that.
Is this any better Loni?
– [Loni] It is better.
– Okay.
– Your last remark (laughs).
– [Ben] Exactly, I’m not gonna move now,
I’m gonna hold this position,
see how well my cell service remains.
So as mentioned, the
measures for recognition
really depend on the transport
destination capabilities.
This is a busy slide, and
I do apologize for it,
but as you can see, the
majority of these measures
EMS agencies are required to report on
and be consistent with are focused around
12 lead ECG acquisition.
That if you just take a quick look
at this STEMI receiving box here,
the first measure is improving
the number of patients that,
or increasing the number of patients
that receive a 12 lead that
could be consistent with STEMI.
The second and third measure
really is what they do
after they have that 12 lead
or have that case identified.
For medical contact to
12 Lead acquisition time,
and then once they receive
or have a positive STEMI
show up on their EKG,
how long is it taking
that EMS provider to activate
the receiving facility
and get the CAD team notified
and mobilized if you will?
And then the final measure’s looking
at the total system performance,
our reprofusion times if you will.
First medical contact to
device in 90 minutes or less
or steps of a measure that you hospitals
I’m sure are very familiar with.
The EMS agencies have a massive component
and some buy-in with that,
and so it really is a system goal.
And so we really want to focus on that.
The STEMI referring facility, same thing,
but they’re looking at
their thrombolytic times
for those patients to get thrombolytics
instead of transfer for primary PCI.
If in those situations,
there’s an EMS agency
that transports to both a STEMI receiving
and then a non-PCI facility,
they have to report
on all of these measures.
The first medical contact
device for those patients
to go to a PCI facility,
the door to needle times
for these patients that
go to a non-PCI facility,
as well as the EKG measures.
Like you say, I do apologize
for the busy slide,
but there is quite a bit
involved with this program,
and it continues to expand.
We’ve had a couple slides here showing
the previous years with it.
Okay, next slide please.
All right, so, as the Mission:
Lifeline EMS recognition
program continues to
evolve, the platform format
is if we have new measures that come up
within our committees,
they’re usually introduced
in an optional or reporting measure,
something that’s not required,
but it gets the wheels turning
on the EMS side of things
in terms of what they
need to start measuring.
Our plus measure is one, that added layer
of recognition, and for this year,
is the plus measure that’s listed,
or the measure that’s listed
in the out of hospital cardiac arrest.
So as you can see, the
evolution of EMS recognition
is really starting to expand and go beyond
just the patients that are
presenting with the STEMI,
we’re looking at the out
of hospital cardiac arrest.
What can we do to help impact the outcomes
of those patients that the
EMS sees prior to arrival,
and of course, with this one, you know,
if we’re able to get the cardiac arrest
into return to spontaneous circulation,
have that sustained for 20 minutes,
we want to then start
digging for the cause,
and so getting the process going,
and we want to see if
it is cardiac in nature,
so like the measure really emphasizes
on getting 12 lead in those cases.
But as you can see, that
these processes if you will
emergencies we’re
expanding into the stroke,
the non-STEMI with Acute
Coronary Syndrome field,
so it is evolving.
This is, I think we’ve had
changes almost every single year
that the program has
been out, which is great,
and we’re looking to expand and hopefully
get those EMS agencies
on board with this stuff.
If you will go to the next slide please.
This slide kind of goes in
with some of the hurdles
and the challenges that EMS agencies face
with the concept of recognition
and the concept of QI processes
or practices on this scale.
Change, I’ve put in the center of this,
just because that’s (laughs),
we’ve all been in healthcare
long enough to know
that change is not necessarily
good, at least initially,
but the change usually happens,
and it does have benefits in the long run.
It’s just making that connection.
So traditionally, as Loni
mentioned in the intro,
you know, I’ve been a
paramedic for a few years,
and when we talk about QI processes,
at least in the services
that I’ve been in,
and there’s difference in wherever we go,
but when we practice QI processes
in the pre-hospital setting,
it was really focused around chart review.
You picked a couple cases
throughout the quarter
or the month, and the
person that was attending
or taking care of that patient
organized the presentation
and maybe really just kind
of went through the chart
with a fine-toothed
comb, which is fantastic,
and it’s a great educational opportunity,
but in terms of QI processes
that we’re doing on this level
in terms of performance outcomes
and systems of care work,
this change has been
relatively challenging.
And a lot of it has to do with the method
in which the data sources are utilized.
For example, you know, as I mentioned,
our measures and requirements
for the measures,
the 12 lead ECG and the placement
in the electronic patient care records,
there are so many different locations
that you can actually put
treatment as a 12 lead ECG.
And so standardizing
documentation practices
has been one the biggest hurdles
that our folks have been faced with.
In addition to the data
sources, there are many vendors,
Loni had that list in her talk
about the different vendors
use for HR and the upload features.
Pre-hospital world is the same setting.
We have different vendors out there,
all of them what we call
(mumbles) compliant,
which means they utilize the same
data definitions for their fields,
but every one of those
is relatively unique.
The data sources and the
way that EMS agencies apply
for Mission: Lifeline,
that’s a manual data mine,
to go through these cases
to identify the age groups,
identify if they’re
related to trauma or not.
You know, narrow down
their chief complaint,
and once you have that,
then you’ve gotta go through
and start filtering
through their treatments,
and it’s a pretty painstaking process.
I’ve worked with a few of the EMS agencies
on getting this stuff done.
We do have tools that are available,
but with uniqueness that presents itself
with our data sources,
the fix is just as unique.
There’s not a cookie-cutter
fix for our challenges
faced with the data sources.
For recognition, once again,
they can get so much information
from their data sources,
but we’re, the need and
some of the challenges,
once again, that are faced by EMS agencies
in getting that system level measurement,
or system level metric, from the hospital.
And so, you know, getting the times,
the reprofusion times, the CAD lab times,
if there were not system
reasons for delay,
which are applicable in
a pre-hospital setting.
So that’s been one of
our biggest challenges
in getting our EMS agencies
involved with this,
which is where we’re putting
our ask out to you guys.
And if you would go into
the next slide please.
The utilization of the
feedback with the performance
that the EMS agencies
do with our semi-cases
is so vitally important.
And I will throw a
footnote on to let you know
we talk a lot about recognition
and the value that goes
in with that, but I think
the actual award is really
the icing on the cake.
If we’re able to get the
award, that means that,
and we all know this, but that means
that our care that’s being delivered
both in pre-hospital setting
as well as the hospital setting
is where it needs to be, and
so it is very, very important
that we get more and
more of our EMS agencies
as well as our hospitals involved
with the recognition program.
And the best way to do that is to identify
our opportunities for improvement,
and this form really
kind of helps with that.
The way that, and this
is just an example here
that was utilized in one
of our statewide projects,
but pre and post CAD
pictures, very quick breakdown
of what was going on with the case.
They called for an ECG, the case synopsis,
and then importantly with
timeline down at the bottom,
and so being able to take
this information back
and view the QI processes
on that case-by-case chart or review
is so important, and we
really highly encourage
that practice to be
adopted in your facilities
if it has not yet been done so.
As you can see with the next slide,
in the Mission: Lifeline
program, as it’s evolved
over the final, or these last few years,
could you hit the next
slide for me there, okay?
You can see that the
number of our EMS agencies
and their participation and the trending
that they’ve, the uptake in this program
has just been fantastic
to watch and be a part of.
Breakdown of this graph, we
have on the far left graph,
the three bars there, blue is 2014,
the gold or orange is
2015, and the gray is 2016.
As you can see, each one of the years,
we’ve seen a massive
increase in our participation
as well as our number of awards.
The one that you see, the
kind of down turn here,
the gold is higher than
the gray, is in 2015
compared to the 2015 for
silver, gold and silver.
When in 2014, this was
our first year of awards,
and there were very few silver awards,
I’m sorry gold awards.
But so we’ve obviously as soon
as we have the opportunity
for our EMS agents…
great, the number of agencies
represented with recognition,
that far right bar graph has
just grown by leaps and bounds.
And it’s really, really exciting,
and we hope that it continues.
And as you can see, the
importance of its continuing
is really based upon
that collaborative effort
between the hospitals
and their EMS agencies,
because as we ask more and
more of our EMS agencies,
that collaborative work
between the two disciplines
is going to grow as well.
Final slides here.
Just one of the greatest
jobs or parts of our job
is being able to
recognize our EMS agencies
and get out into the
community, present the award,
as well as do kind of a
highlight to the decision makers
within those organizations.
Just one more slide please
if you don’t mind, okay?
Thank you.
And that’s, like, so this is
really the best opportunity,
whether irrespective
of the type of service,
whether it’s hospital-based,
community-based,
fire-based, getting out
there and putting a spotlight
on these crews as well as the
hospitals that they work with
is just one of the most rewarding
and gratifying parts of the job.
And so we really thank
you all for what you do,
and by all means, let us
know if there’s anything
we can do to help you.
And with that, I’ll
kick it over to Kristen.
– [Kristen] Thank you Ben.
Hi everybody, I’m Kristen Waller,
and I’m the Quality and
Systems Improvement Director
for Arkansas.
Aldre, if you could go
back just one slide,
and I’ll give a little
bit of my background.
The bottom picture is
actually the facility
where I worked at before.
I as a Chest Pain STEMI Coordinator.
I have some background in the CAD lab,
cardiac rehab, as an Abstracter.
So in this picture, you’ll
see both of our EMS agencies
in our country and our hospital
with all of our Mission: Lifeline awards.
And so, just to point out,
this really is a system of care approach.
It all started with our county EMS.
He worked hard to obtain his
Mission: Lifeline awards,
and then the hospital got on board,
and the city, fire
department, ambulance, and so,
we were all able to
work together to achieve
better patient outcomes and in the process
receive awards and recognition.
Okay, next slide please.
And you can go one more please.
So I’m gonna talk to you
today about the benefits
of Get with the Guidelines CAD.
As I said before, you
know, I’ve abstracted
for the ACTION registry,
announcing the CAD registry,
so I want to point out some
of the benefits of CAD today.
But also one of the
benefits of continuing,
participating in Mission:
Lifeline, achieving award status,
we have QSI filled staff available
and ready to answer questions, to help,
to come to your site and visit.
We now have real time reporting available
and super user function
availability coming soon.
Next slide please.
So this is just an example
of what our awards look like.
The icon that you would receive
to use with your hospital.
There’s awards for EMS,
for the referring center,
and also for the receiving center.
Next slide please.
Some of the recognition that we have.
Here’s a picture of the U.S.
News and World Report magazine.
We are able to provide you
with a marketing tool kit
for your hospital that
you could use on Facebook,
so your marketing teams
could put that out,
your nurses, your cardiologists,
anybody who wanted to, you know,
spread the news in your community,
that you have been recognized
in the U.S. News and World Report.
And also Twitter is available there too,
once you go into that.
When you click on it, you
can click on your state,
and it will actually
show all of the hospitals
that made award status this past year.
Next slide please.
For our hospitals that
achieved silver or gold status,
the are recognized at Scientific Sessions,
so that’s exciting.
There’s a reception there
for those hospitals.
They get an invitation,
and you can come out
to California this year and be recognized.
Next slide please.
So this year, in order to
achieve recognition for 2018,
you only have to enter one quarter of data
into Get with the Guidelines CAD.
As Loni said earlier, it is
free to enter data in 2017.
If you want to achieve
Mission: Lifeline status
or maintain the current
award level that you have,
then you only have to
enter one quarter of data.
You do not have to worry about
entering the entire year.
You can enter two quarters of data
into Get with the Guidelines CAD this year
in order to increase your
award level status for 2018.
There is not a deadline as
far as entering quarterly,
but the ability to enter
2017’s data will end in March,
so you do have until March
to enter data for 2017.
And we certainly encourage you
to enter on a regular basis
so that you can see how you’re doing
and fix problems as they arise, issues,
and address it as you go.
Next slide please.
Here’s just some examples.
If you’ve never participated before
in Mission: Lifeline
and the ACTION registry,
then you would need to enter
two or more quarters of data
to achieve bronze or bronze
plus, silver or silver plus.
Or you could do one if you’re just trying
to obtain bronze level.
If you participated in the
past, say for gold or gold plus,
and you just need to
enter one quarter of data
to continue having your
gold or gold plus status.
So just look at the examples
on that slide right there
and see what you would
need to do in order to
either achieve status or if you want
to maintain or increase.
But only one or two quarters
of data are required for 2017
for recognition in 2018.
Next slide please.
Real time reports are available
now for all of the measures.
If you’re a receiving center,
you can enter your data.
We’ll look at the primary PCI time
as less than or equal to nine minutes.
Your EMS first medical contact
primary PCI 90 minutes or less.
Making sure you get your aspirin
at arrival and discharge,
your beta discharge, your staten, smoking,
and then if they are coming
from a referral center
to your receiving center,
then primary PCI in less
than or equal to 120 minutes.
Now we also have the availability
for referral centers to
enter their data as well.
And for them, we’re looking
to see if they were able to do
an ECG within 10 minutes of arrival.
If they get thrombolytics, if
that’s done within 30 minutes,
and also, the focus would be on door in,
door out of 45 minutes, so we want them
to quickly transport to
the receiving center.
So that is one of their measures.
The aspirin discharge, the beta discharge,
the staten discharge,
and the smoking cessation
for referral centers do not apply
if you transfer them out to
a receiving center for PCI.
So if you keep the
patient at your facility
for whatever reason, then
all of those would apply.
But if you’re a referral center,
and you’re transferring
them to a receiving center,
then obviously, our main
focus is you get the EKG,
the thrombolytics if they can’t
get PCI within 120 minutes,
and then you get them door
in, door out in 45 minutes,
so that you can quickly
get them to the PCI center.
And then we also have a real time report
for non-STEMIs as well.
Next slide please.
Something that we’ve started
is what we call data days,
and so quarterly, we
will send each hospital
that participating in Get
with the Guidelines CAD
a snapshot of their data
and where they stand
as far as award status
and how they’re meeting their measures.
Now, it’s not final.
Like I said before,
you know, you have time
to enter your data, but it’s
just gonna be where you are
at that particular time in the quarter,
to let you know how things are going,
where you need to focus.
And then two weeks after
we send out that data,
we have what we call quality exchange.
And so, everyone and
our affiliates call in,
and we get a, you can ask
question, we have advice,
best practices for mother
hospitals, you know,
what they’ve done to make something work
that they’re having trouble with.
So it’s just a time to come together
and share what’s working
for us, what’s not,
you know, what questions we might have,
things that we need to fix.
So our next data day where
we send out those reports
will be in October, and then
on Thursday, November the 2nd,
at 8:00 a.m., we will
have our quality exchange,
and that’s the conference call.
Next slide please.
Okay, so this is what
Get with the Guidelines CAD looks like.
Your hospital may already be participating
in maybe Stroke or AFIB or Heart Failure,
but there is a tab, they’re
all there at the beginning
on the community page, and CAD is there.
You’ll see on the right, there’s a legend,
and so the little circle with
one person is new patient.
ClicK on there to get started.
If you want to see all the
patients you’ve entered,
then there’s an icon with
two people in a circle,
and then the next one is reports,
and then the next one is resources.
So, there’s more tabs there
that you can click on,
and then there’s also training available.
You just click on those tabs as well.
Next slide please.
And in order to click
on a real time report,
which as soon as you
have entered a patient,
you can go in and create a report.
You don’t have to wait,
it’s automatically available for you.
But you have the availability
to run reports by year,
by quarter, month, day.
You can just to check in the boxes
and select which ones you want to do.
You can run it by certain measures,
like if you’re having
trouble when to work in PCI,
or maybe it’s a beta-blocker discharge,
whatever it is that you’re wanting to run,
you can run that.
You can choose how you format it,
if you want to compare to
your state, to your region,
you can do that as well.
You do not have to wait
until the end of the quarter
or whenever the reports
are released to you.
You can go in and do that yourself.
And also, you can build and save reports.
There at the bottom, you see the tab
that says add and edit report,
you can save it right there
and compare and go back to it,
have it available for you.
So you are able to create these reports
for what you need, what
your hospital needs.
Next slide please.
So here is an example
of a regional report,
and of course, it’s blinded.
There’s three different hospitals here.
We do require that there be
six hospitals in a region
in order for there to be a regional report
just to keep things blinded
and hospitals unable to guess who is who.
But if you do not have six
hospitals in your region,
and all hospitals are agreeable
to be in a regional report,
then that is a possibility there.
So that’s just a way to
show how you’re performing,
how other hospitals are performing,
and let you know what you need to work on.
And so this can exciting, you know,
if you feel like your
hospital is performing
exceptionally well, and you can take this
to your cardiologist and show
them that you really are,
and it’s an exciting thing
to be able to provide.
Next slide please.
Like I said, super user
accounts are coming.
You would be able to look
at statewide reports,
regional reports, there
are some hospital systems
that own several hospitals in the region,
so a super user would be able to go in
and compare all of their hospitals.
Next slide please.
Also, I’ll just mention this,
you don’t have to go back,
but you know, if your health
department is interested,
a super user account would
be a good thing for them
where they could go in and look as well.
So this is showing real
time measure calculations.
And what I did is I went
in and entered a patient,
and you’ll see that the measures tab
is the one that’s highlighted.
But you have an admissions tab,
a pre-hospital arrival tab,
there’s a hospitalization tab,
and then there is a discharge tab.
Before you actually submit that patient,
you are able to run the
measures right then.
So you click on calculate measures,
and this is what comes up.
So this patient met all the
measures that applied to them.
They received their aspirin at discharge,
the beta-blocker discharge, their staten,
and they happen to be a
door in, door out to balloon
in less than 120 minutes.
And so they were compliant
with that measure as well.
So the other ones that are grayed-out,
they’re automatically
excluded, because, you know,
it did not apply to them
for that particular patient,
because they were a door
in, door out balloon.
Next slide please.
So here is another example
of a patient that I entered,
and then I selected calculate measures
before I actually submitted the patient.
And so, now I’m seeing red.
This patient fell out.
So they didn’t get their
staten at discharge,
they didn’t get their ACE at discharge.
Everything else went well, that didn’t.
There’s actually an errors tab
to the right of your screen.
As you’re entering patients,
you can click on that,
and it will let you know
as you enter patients,
you know, if you’re missed something,
or something didn’t add up,
something wasn’t quite right,
so it will actually
let you know as you go.
You don’t have to submit the patient
and then see, you know,
if something fell out.
So when I calculate a
measure, those things came up.
So I wanted to know, you
know, why or what happened.
So next slide please.
So before I submitted the patient,
I looked, and I saw where their EF was 30,
so they should have
received an ACE or an ORB,
and they should have
received cholesterol medicine
before they left as well.
So this patient that I’ve put
in, I put in as yesterday.
So what I would do next
is I would take that
and go directly to the source,
so I’d go to the cardiologist
or the hospitalist
or case management or
somebody and say hey,
we recently had this patient.
They didn’t get their
medications on discharge.
You know, we need to fix this.
Is this a system problem
where we can, you know,
have some hard stops where
we discharge a patient
where we have to select, you know,
that they need these medications?
Do we need to educate some more?
Do we need to educate nurses to ask?
Say hey, do we want to send
them home on these medicines?
But you can go fix the issue
sooner rather than later.
In the past, when you
received quarterly reports,
and you didn’t, weren’t able
to realize this right away,
it’s hard with fast turnover,
with physician turnover
to be able to go back and say hey,
for you six months ago,
you forgot to prescribe
such and such on this chart.
So you know, we need to, from here on out,
we need to make sure they get their ACEs
or ORB or their cholesterol
medicine or whatever it may be.
And so you’ve gone three to six months
without taking care of the issue,
and now, you can fix it right then.
Next slide please.
And there is a way to do
patient drill downs as well.
If you want to go in,
there’s patient list,
you just click on that, and
you can look at a patient.
Next slide please.
And then there’s filters for comparison.
So maybe you do great
Monday through Friday
when the CAD lab is there,
when everyone’s available.
Maybe it’s Saturday or Sunday
that you struggle with.
So you could go in and
click on arrival dates,
Saturday and Sunday,
and filter it by then,
compare, see where issues
may be appearing the weekend hours.
Maybe you’re wanting to
compare males verus females.
If you want to go by rates,
or maybe how they arrived.
You want to look at
certain ambulance agencies
in your area, maybe one’s,
you know, excelling,
and one’s struggling just a little bit.
So you can pull them up agency,
you can pull them by the referral center,
and you can actually pull
them by physician as well,
if you need to compare your physicians
and these are available
in real time as well.
Next slide please.
So coming soon, we will
have full data reports
for Chest Pain Accreditation.
We will have additional
elements available to enter
for CAD and ACS tracking.
And then, site specific
optional fields for data.
Some facilities have certain
data that they want to collect,
and so it is possible
to add optional fields
for whatever it is that
your hospital needs.
Next slide please.
So in addition to today’s webinar,
we have one in two weeks on Wednesday,
October the 4th at noon.
And then we have another one on Tuesday,
October the 17th at noon.
And the third one on
the 17th will focus on
the STEMI referring hospitals.
So if you have any referral
centers that you would like
to maybe participate in Get
with the Guidelines CAD,
we encourage you to share
this flier with them,
and we will focus on them,
because we know maybe that
they might be interested
in gaining recognition and awards as well
and getting those
measures to their bedside,
knowing that their focus is getting an ACT
within 10 minutes and getting
thromobolytics within 30,
and then getting them door
in, door in within 45 minutes
on their way to you.
So if you have some referral centers
that are maybe struggling
with that just a little bit,
we encourage you to share
this flier with them.
Or if they’re doing great, and you think
that they deserve recognition,
please share this webinar
flier with them as well.
Next slide please.
– [Loni] Thank you so much Kristen and Ben
for your great presentations.
We wanted to make sure that we have time
to open it up for Q&A.
All of our contact information
is listed on this screen.
Feel free to email any one
of us with your questions
if anything comes up after the webinar.
And if you want to ask a question,
just feel free to come off mute.
You can do that by hitting *6,
not #6, but *6, to come off mute
and ask your question, and
then if you hit *6 again,
you will go back on mute.
And also enter your written questions
into the Q&A section
directly into the webinar,
so give you a few minutes
to either come off mute
and start enter a question,
and we’re happy to answer
any of those that you have.
We can put it up.
So someone has asked a
question, if we can…
if we can share the slides
with you after the webinar.
We definitely will do that.
We’ll send it out to all of the attendees.
So, another question is
will this webinar number two
be different than the first,
this one that we’ve conducted today.
So on that second webinar,
we’re going to do less
of the overview and program changes
and more of what the types of things
that Kristen covered today
and going into more of
the detail on actually
utilizing the tool.
And then one other clarification
that I wanted to make sure
to make it that this year
during Scientific Sessions,
we are going to honor
all of our Mission:
Lifeline awarded hospitals.
So if you are a bronze-level
hospital or silver or gold,
we welcome you to come out to Anaheim,
and we would love to celebrate with you.
If you can send a representative
from your hospital,
whether you’re bronze, silver, or gold,
you’re all welcome to come out.
We have the save-the-date available,
and we’ll be sending out the
details about registration
for that event, hopefully by next week.
An additional question that came in
was if we can elaborate on
the Chest Pain Accreditation
capabilities in Mission: Lifeline.
So right now, hospitals
that want to pursue
Chest Pain Center accreditation
are entering their data
into several different platforms.
We have, our leadership in
the American Heart Association
and American College of
Cardiology leadership
met recently and decided that
the Get with the Guidelines
Coronary Artery Disease
will be an allowed source
for Chest Pain Center data submission.
So we, right now, have the
ability for you to enter
your STEMI patients,
your non-STEMI patients,
your API patients into the tool,
and we are in the process of building out
all of the measures that you will need
for your Chest Pain Center accreditation.
The kinds of things that are
included in the ACG tool now.
That is scheduled.
There is a plan for that
to be ready to go live
the beginning of the year for you.
If all goes as planned, it
will be ready early 2018.
Any additional questions
from anyone on the line?
Hit *6 to unmute yourself
or type your question
into Q&A section of the webinar.
So there’s an additional
question that was typed in.
Is the data collection
the same as the data
for the ACTION registry,
and do we have a data collection form?
So we’re definitely willing to share
the data collection form with you.
You can send me an email
request, [email protected]
We can share that with you.
In terms of the data being
the same, so right now,
you’re able to enter, many of the fields
marry up with the ACTION registry.
We have a few additional
fields that are more related
to your pre-hospital, what’s
going on pre-hospital,
so things like, you know,
whether EMS notifies
your facility that they
have a STEMI patient
and then whether you activated your system
based on that information.
Just a few things like that
that are additional
system-type data elements.
– [Kristen] And Loni, too,
on that, the data form,
when you enter a patient, another
wanting to blank field it,
when you enter a patient, and you’re done,
you have the capability
of printing that form.
And so it comes out nice and neat
for those who keep a paper copy as well
or issue those for review,
so I have found that.
– [Loni] Thank you Kristen.
We have a question about
how much it would cost
to participate in Get with the Guidelines
Heart Failure as well.
I’m not as familiar,
but we do have someone checking on that.
So if we have the answer
before we close out,
we can talk about that, and if not,
if you’re able to send us an email,
we’ll get that pricing to you.
But all of our, the pricing
for our modules are similar.
I believe it’s less than
Get with the Guidelines CAD,
and we subsidize our registries heavily
to make participation in the
registry more affordable.
Oh, one of our QSI directors
who’s here in the room with us
just pulled it up, it’s
$2072 to participate
in Get with the Guidelines Heart Failure.
Someone is asking if there is only one fee
or if there are renewal fees
for participating in the registry.
The pricing that we had pulled up earlier
in the webinar is for 2018.
The tool is completely
free for you to join
and try out in 2017.
Discounts are available if you sign up
for 2018 by November 1st.
And then each year,
there is a renewal fee,
so the pricing for 2018
just for use of the tool
for the January 1st, 2018
to December 31st of 2018,
and then you would need to renew for 2019.
Any additional questions?
Okay, so it’s six minutes before the hour,
so we’ll go ahead and close out.
Please feel free to email
myself or Ben or Kristen
with additional questions.
We’re here for you.
We hope that you’re able to join us
for our subsequent webinars.
The next one will be held on October 4th
at 12:00, noon, central time.
We appreciate all of your
time, and thank you so much.
Take care.
(disconnects phone)

Leave a Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *